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Corona quarantine diary
Автор темы: Mervyn Henderson

Rachel Fell  Identity Verified
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language Oct 27, 2020

Mervyn Henderson wrote:

"nocturnal mobility restriction"

As so often, why use one word when you can use three? Some awful terminology has arisen from the current "pandemic" situation.


P.L.F.Persio
 

expressisverbis
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A language is more powerful than we think Oct 27, 2020

"If you are in quaranteam you are a covidiot".
This sentence conveys an important message, and it is reinforcing something in the same way as the "restricción de la movilidad nocturna" or "toque de queda" whichever we would like to use.
Even though coronavirus neologisms or new expressions sound a bit strange, they can educate "insane" people to be self-disciplined.
A language is always evolving, changing, and adapting to the needs of its users. This "viral language" is the be
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"If you are in quaranteam you are a covidiot".
This sentence conveys an important message, and it is reinforcing something in the same way as the "restricción de la movilidad nocturna" or "toque de queda" whichever we would like to use.
Even though coronavirus neologisms or new expressions sound a bit strange, they can educate "insane" people to be self-disciplined.
A language is always evolving, changing, and adapting to the needs of its users. This "viral language" is the best example of that.
I hope it is playing an important role in this global fight against the spread of this horrible "bug".
Some new words can be awful, but they can be powerful, too.
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Mervyn Henderson
P.L.F.Persio
 

Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
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Johnny Holiday Oct 28, 2020

Ahead of All Saints’ Day on Sunday, much moaning to be heard, although mostly up the coast in Gipuzkoa, for obvious reasons. The obvious reasons are the foreigners - the French, to be precise. The Basque Government has no authority to close an international border despite the restrictions, and so over they come in droves, but it’s one-way traffic only, from there to here, because here people aren’t allowed to leave their own town, let alone cross any borders.

The French usual
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Ahead of All Saints’ Day on Sunday, much moaning to be heard, although mostly up the coast in Gipuzkoa, for obvious reasons. The obvious reasons are the foreigners - the French, to be precise. The Basque Government has no authority to close an international border despite the restrictions, and so over they come in droves, but it’s one-way traffic only, from there to here, because here people aren’t allowed to leave their own town, let alone cross any borders.

The French usually come over here for Toussaint but this time, as someone said in the newspaper, “What, the Frogs can come over here, not even for work or nuffink, with no justification, and not even have to stop at the border in Irún, and can go on down to Donostia or Hondarribia, while I can’t leave Irún?”

And they weren’t here for work, either, because they were slugging back the vino and pintxos like nobody’s business in Donostia, by all accounts. Dear me. That’s Johnny Foreigner for you. He comes over here, he drinks all our txakoli and he eats all our pintxos.

Still, those Gauls have to watch themselves with the time, if they’re here in the evening. Curfew time is 10 pm back in France, or so I hear, whereas it’s 11 pm here, so they have to either leg it back to France by about 9.30, or they’re looking at paying for a hotel on this side of the border. That, or a 3,000 euro fine, is it, in France (?), when they get back across the border? Not that leaving early will be a problem for the French because they’re kind of used to that. As anyone knows who’s made the journey from Irún to Hendaye around 7 or 8 in the evening, for example, the difference in atmosphere between two towns only a few kilometres apart across a river is abysmal - Hendaye is already like a ghost town by that time, whereas Irún is still alive with people everywhere. But it might not be so lively around here on the Day of the Dead this year anyway.
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expressisverbis
 

Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
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Q: When are the homeless not homeless? Oct 28, 2020

A: When they have a home to go to.

I'd forgotten about this one:

In March all those sleeping in shop doorways and bank vestibules were rounded up and taken to shelters for the duration. Not this time, though, because, in the dubious and post-event wisdom of the powers-that-be, when they're in that shop doorway or curled up beside that ATM under their cardboard, they're officially "at home", aren't they?

Sorted.


expressisverbis
 

expressisverbis
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Portugal is a joke Oct 28, 2020

We can't visit a loved one's grave, but we can have 30,000 "Fangios" watching Formula One races, or see more than the allowed number of passengers in public transport, etc.

Mervyn Henderson
 

Tom in London
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Loved one Oct 28, 2020

I hate the expression "Loved One". I first became aware of it in Evelyn Waugh's satirical novel, published in 1948, which he entitled "The Loved One" - using the expression with heavy irony, as part of his sarcastic, disapproving debunk of the American commercialisation and packaging of funerals. Alas, since then that horrible expression has been absorbed into British English as well - but I would never use it myself.

Rachel Fell
expressisverbis
Mervyn Henderson
P.L.F.Persio
 

Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
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But ... Oct 28, 2020

... a bit hasty, that first comment of mine. I see Tom was really only thinking about Waugh's satire, not stirring with what Exy said. And I liked Waugh, too.

I suspect "loved ones" is probably overused in these Corona times, that's all.

[Edited at 2020-10-28 16:32 GMT]

[Edited at 2020-10-28 16:32 GMT]


P.L.F.Persio
expressisverbis
Rachel Fell
 

Chris S  Identity Verified
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A virtual hug Oct 28, 2020

Tom, I’m sending you a virtual hug.

expressisverbis
Mervyn Henderson
Jan Truper
P.L.F.Persio
 

expressisverbis
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Tom, let me rephrase it: Oct 28, 2020

"I can't visit my mother's grave, but we can have 30,000 "Fangios" watching Formula One races, or see more than the allowed number of passengers in public transport, etc."

But I agree with you, I don't like the term "love" or any derivative word, because it is a word that everyone uses, but no one can really show it.
It's alright, I understood you. You were only explaining how the expression came into British English.
No problem at all with that. I appreciate it. It's s
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"I can't visit my mother's grave, but we can have 30,000 "Fangios" watching Formula One races, or see more than the allowed number of passengers in public transport, etc."

But I agree with you, I don't like the term "love" or any derivative word, because it is a word that everyone uses, but no one can really show it.
It's alright, I understood you. You were only explaining how the expression came into British English.
No problem at all with that. I appreciate it. It's something new I learned today. Thank you.



[Edited at 2020-10-28 19:06 GMT]
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P.L.F.Persio
Mervyn Henderson
Angie Garbarino
 

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"Nearest and dearest"? Oct 29, 2020

Is that better or worse on the Yeeugh Scale? Rather contrived? Repellent? Should we have a poll?

expressisverbis
Kay Denney
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Chris S  Identity Verified
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Beware Oct 29, 2020

expressisverbis wrote:
It's alright, I understood you. You were only explaining how the expression came into British English.
No problem at all with that. I appreciate it. It's something new I learned today. Thank you.

Just make sure you take Tom’s English lessons with a pinch of salt. His recommendations are often far from conventional.

I have no problem at all with “loved one”.


expressisverbis
Kay Denney
Michele Fauble
 

Tom in London
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No, I wasn't Oct 29, 2020

expressisverbis wrote:

You were only explaining how the expression came into British English.


No, I wasn't. I don't know how the expression "loved one" came into British English and I certainly wasn't explaining it.

I imagine it's by the same kind of cultural subservience that caused the past participle of "to get" ("gotten") to be (a) exported to American English in the 16th century (b) re-imported into British English in the 21st century.

Or a different variant of the same cultural subservience that has caused the adjective "everyday" to acquire the same meaning as "every day". This has become an everyday offence. I see it used every day.

Or again, another variant that has enabled "momentarily" (meaning: for a moment) to acquire the completely different meaning "in a moment".

Or the term "to deprecate" to become "to depreciate" (the latter, I suspect, caused by illiterate American computer geeks who have never deprecated anything).

I deprecate all of it. Ho hum.

As it's now going on for midday I shall be having my lunch in a moment - but not momentarily because I like to eat slowly and chew on my food.



[Edited at 2020-10-29 11:28 GMT]


P.L.F.Persio
expressisverbis
Mervyn Henderson
 

expressisverbis
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I will get used to it Oct 29, 2020

Chris S wrote:

Just make sure you take Tom’s English lessons with a pinch of salt. His recommendations are often far from conventional.

I have no problem at all with “loved one”.


Thanks, Chris, I know that, and I will get used to it.
Honestly, I'm more interested in reading Mervyn's diary which is something that has delighted us to this day than knowing what Tom hates or loves.
Although I appreciate some new information like the one he indicated above.
I'm sorry, "I'm with the olive oils", and I hope Tom will hate this expression.

For colleagues who are interested in idioms like me:
http://lisbonlanguagecafe.pt/funny-portuguese-phrases/


Mervyn Henderson
P.L.F.Persio
Angie Garbarino
 

Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
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Check out those Portuguese expressions! Oct 29, 2020

Thanks for the link, Exy. Very amusing - it's always double the fun when you translate them literally into another language, isn't it?

I don't know about her olive oils, but others might have "spent many years turning chickens", or "turning the record over and playing the same song", I'm not sure which.:-)


expressisverbis
P.L.F.Persio
 

expressisverbis
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Not only in British English Oct 29, 2020

Tom in London wrote:

expressisverbis wrote:

You were only explaining how the expression came into British English.


No, I wasn't. I don't know how the expression "loved one" came into British English and I certainly wasn't explaining it.

I imagine it's by the same kind of cultural subservience that caused the past participle of "to get" ("gotten") to be (a) exported to American English in the 16th century (b) re-imported into British English in the 21st century.

Or a different variant of the same cultural subservience that has caused the adjective "everyday" to acquire the same meaning as "every day". This has become an everyday offence. I see it used every day.

Or again, another variant that has enabled "momentarily" (meaning: for a moment) to acquire the completely different meaning "in a moment".

Or the term "to deprecate" to become "to depreciate" (the latter, I suspect, caused by illiterate American computer geeks who have never deprecated anything).

I deprecate all of it. Ho hum.

As it's now going on for midday I shall be having my lunch in a moment - but not momentarily because I like to eat slowly and chew on my food.



[Edited at 2020-10-29 11:28 GMT]



Certainly, this doesn't happen only in English, but in other languages as well.
For example, "contract" which is written in Portuguese as "contrato" is often seen as "contraCto", the verb "to extend" which is "estender" is seen several times as "eXtender", and so on.
These are grammar (lexical) errors, of course. I could give you many other examples.
I share the same feeling, believe me.
The term "loved ones" is something that sounds natural for me in English or in other languages I know ("os entes queridos" (PT); "les bien-aimés (FR)"; "los entes queridos" (ES)).
The expression came from Latin most likely and then coined in English.
If it isn't the right term in British English that's another story that only you as a native speaker can explain.


[Edited at 2020-10-29 13:40 GMT]


P.L.F.Persio
Angie Garbarino
 
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